1.0 The simplest of all rhythms: an uninterrupted sequence (Preview)

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sequence1gray-300x300A simple rhythm. Repeating shapes create a pattern. These circular shapes as well as the space between and around these shapes can help create movement as well. Pattern with movement produces rhythm. The simple arrangement of dots shown here is an uninterrupted sequence. The nature of a shape or line and its pacing within a pattern can either create or inhibit a rhythm.

It’s your turn! Create your own version of an uninterrupted sequence through the medium of your choosing: photography, painting, drawing, digital tools, mixed media, etc. Below are some examples of a simple rhythm, applied to real projects. Check the Pinterest board on Rhythm and find even more examples.

Exercises in RHythm example 1.1F.ScottFitzgeraldCoversgil-melle-patterns-in-jazz-album-coverAlhambra tile1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the upper left, an example of this exercise applied, but with the relevant pattern present in a vertical direction.

Center, an example of this exercise applied in a series of bookcovers.

On the upper right, another example of this exercise but created in ink and brush. Blue Note records. The inconsistencies from dot to dot extend the feeling of movement.

Last image is an example of two uninterrupted sequences of rhythm (one of stars and the other of curved triangles) that happen to integrate with one another. The Alhambra; Granada, Spain. Howard Schneider, photographer.

These learning modules have been created solely to promote awareness of design principles and elements through commentary and critical analysis. 

When you’re done, post to Facebook, Pinterest, or Instagram.

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